Before we start the story of the story behind Hell to Pay, I wanted to let you guys know Fighting for Anna comes out November 4th, and I need your support. How? People most often buy books based on some kind of recommendation. By Amazon. By word of mouth. By their friends on social media. And often authors’s friends want to help them but don’t know how. I have an easy way you can help me on your social media, using the message and image below. If you click Join This Thunderclap, then on Nov. 4th at 8:30 p.m., THIS message will be posted on your social media (and the social media of all my other supporters).  Same time, same message, best chance of “trending” or “going viral.” I’ve vetted the privacy of Thunderclap myself and want you to know I am quite sure they don’t use your social media for anything other than this post, but read for yourself if you have concerns (I’ve done them before with no problems).

So…click below? (Email subscribers may have to visit the post on my website to participate) And then share the opportunity to support the Thunderclap with your followers, too?

Thunderclap supporters will be entered into a drawing for a $25 Nook/Barnes & Noble gift card.

Now, back to the story behind the story!

Despite over a year of conversations about the plot and characters in the Emily books, it was on the eve of drafting Heaven to Betsy that game-changing inspiration struck. I discovered a terrorist group operating in West Texas, my childhood stomping grounds. As a potential plot river, it was timely (in light of terrorism in the name of religious beliefs occurring around the U.S.: Boston, Chattanooga, and others). But it is different from those. This is a domestic terrorist group of U.S. citizens which bases its judgments and actions on Christian beliefs, not Muslim ones. Think Westboro Baptist Church. I’m not going to name the group, because its name doesn’t matter. All terrorism is terrorism. All these groups are, to me, using religious interpretations to make judgments upon which they base actions.

Now, I’m no religious scholar, but I am quite familiar with Judge Not Lest Ye Be Judged, and I was taught that Judgment was the job of a higher power. I admire evangelists who seek to convert through education and legal, nonviolent, nondestructive persuasion to make the world a better place and save souls, even in situations where I may not share their beliefs.

I despise terrorist acts.

I despise them even more when they’re happening in the community where I grew up, in the name of the religion practiced by myself and so many wonderful people there who are living positive lives of positive acts and positive intentions. I do not appreciate a terrorist group using my faith as the justification for their bad acts.

(I know Muslims who feel this way, and I feel sure most people would feel this way about any affiliation of theirs where a splinter group misuses their name and beliefs.)

So, as a result of me discovering this group, the Mighty is His Word of Emily’s world was born, an Army for God, willing to do things that the God I know doesn’t sanction.

Honestly, it felt goooooood to write about them.  To let the story find its way to me, to feel the tentacles of all the story lines weaving themselves around this cult, to untangle them carefully at the climax and slip Emily, Jack, and Betsy from their grasp. To give them an ending I felt was just for the fictional version. I loved writing about the compound, the Hodges, and Emily’s indoctrination. [My real favorite in this book, though, was Phil’s mother. Writing that scene was a highlight for me.]

As usual, I won’t spoil the plot for you, but I will add that since I centered this novel more in West Texas and less in New Mexico, I honed in on the Hopi Native Americans for the story’s “magical realism” and sought Emily’s maturation through her reliance on her spirit animal.

I also began to explore something deeply fascinating to me, that I see as a future for the Laura books: equine therapy (equitherapy or hippotherapy) for children.

It occurs to me that in writing about this cult I am, in a way, judging their judging. I’ll have to ponder on how I feel about that for awhile 😉

Before I go, I want to offer each of you a chance at free codes for the just released audiobook box set of The Katie & Annalise Romantic Mysteries from my What Doesn’t Kill You Series (Books 1-3).

a Rafflecopter giveaway

(Email subscribers may have to visit the post on my website to participate)

My best,

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p.s. We had a great time in Alaska at the Alaska Writers Guild annual conference. I taught a workshop, a breakout session, and participated on the Q&A Panel, and Eric led a critique circle. We met awesome writers, and we were enchanted with Anchorage.

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Paneling with an agent, an Alaskan indie author, and a NYT bestseller-turned-Thomas & Mercer (Amazon) author. Fun!

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Dinner at the lovely home of author Jim Misko and his wife Patty with a view of the Chugach mountains.

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My sweet husband, who had flowers sent ahead to our hotel room.

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Celebrating a fun, successful trip (and a win by the Texas Aggies over Arkansas) with fried halibut at F Street Station.

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9 Responses to Judge Not: The Story Behind the Story of Hell to Pay

  1. Patricia Hanken says:

    I am looking forward to reading Fighting for Anna! I pre-ordered on Amazon! I wish you the best in all you do Pamela!

  2. Michelle Nelson-Lowery says:

    Pamela I cannot wait for this new book! I’ve finished the first three books just ordered four and love all of them! I cannot tell you how much I love to read and your series of books do not disappoint! If you ever make to Salt Lake City with your book tours let me know! I would love to help or promote! Thanks so much and keep writing for those of us addicted to your stories!

  3. Eric says:

    The conversation with Phil’s mother, in my opinion is some of your very best writing. It is just flat azz perfect.
    However, most of all I love the passion that you brought to this book, and the risks you took potentially offending some folks that you hold dear, to shine a balanced light on a sensitive subject.

    • Pamela says:

      Well, I hope it was balanced. I did my best. I fear we all bring our inherent biases with us, and that impacts our view of what is balanced, but now I’m just sounding like the harassment and discrimination investigator and diversity instructor I’ve been for 20 years 😉

  4. Judith says:

    Thanks for sharing the photos from the visit to Alaska and the one off your handsome husband.
    The story around the terrorists sounds intriguing. Can’t wait to read it

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